Friday, August 13, 2010

International Travel Increasing Spread of New Drug-Resistant Bacteria

Hopefully this news will help to stem the spread of "transplant tourism" and the exploitation of poor, uneducated people who are convinced to sell one of their kidneys, for example, to provide for their families. Foreign transplants may be compromised by poor organ matching, unhealthy donors, and post-transplant infections, while some transplant centers abroad may use substandard surgical techniques. This new super-bug makes matters even worse.

Doctor's Guide
NEW YORK -- August 10, 2010 -- A new gene -- New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase (NDM) 1 -- that enables bacteria to be highly resistant to almost all antibiotics is widespread in Enterobacteriaceae taken from patients in India and Pakistan, and has also been found in UK patients who travelled to India for elective surgery, according to a study published early online and appearing in the September print edition of The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

The rapid emergence of these multi-drug resistant NDM-1 producing bacteria and their potential worldwide spread could herald a period in which antibiotics become redundant and demands very close international monitoring and surveillance.

In 2009, Timothy Walsh, MD, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom, and international colleagues first identified the NDM-1 gene in Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli bacteria taken from a Swedish patient admitted to hospital in India. Worryingly, NDM-1-producing bacteria are resistant to many antibiotics including carbapenems.

In this study, the authors investigated how common the NDM-1 producing antibiotic resistant bacteria are in Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan and the importation of these bacteria into the UK via patients returning from these countries.

The researchers collected bacteria samples from patients presenting with various hospital and community-associated infections in Chennai and Haryana in India, and from patients referred to the UK's national reference laboratory between 2007 and 2009. Samples were tested for antibiotic susceptibility and the presence of the NDM-1 gene using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing.

They identified 44 (1.5%) NDM-1-positive bacteria in Chennai, 26 (8%) in Haryana, 37 in the UK, and 73 in other sites in Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan. NDM-1 was mostly found in E coli (36), the most common cause of community-associated urinary tract infections, and K pneumoniae (111).

The NDM-1-producing bacteria were highly resistant to all antibiotics except tigecycline and colistin. In some cases, isolates were resistant to all antibiotics.

Importantly, the NDM-1 gene was found to be present on plasmids, suggesting "an alarming potential to spread and diversify among bacterial populations."

The authors said that the emergence of NDM-1 positive bacteria is potentially a serious global public health problem as there are few new anti-Gram-negative antibiotics in development and none that are effective against NDM-1. Consequently, we are facing a period in which antibiotics become redundant. "Even more disturbing is that most of the India isolates from Chennai and Haryana were from community-acquired infections, suggesting that NDM-1 is widespread in the environment," the authors wrote.

They concluded by pointing out that several of the UK NDM-1 positive patients had travelled to India or Pakistan for surgical procedures (including cosmetic) within the past year. "India also provides cosmetic surgery for other Europeans and Americans, and it is likely NDM-1 will spread worldwide," they said.

In an accompanying comment, Johann Pitout, MD, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, warned that patients who have medical procedures in India should be screened for multiresistant bacteria before they receive care in their home country: "If this emerging public health threat is ignored, sooner or later the medical community could be confronted with carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae that cause common infections, resulting in treatment failures with substantial increases in health-care costs."

SOURCE: The Lancet Infectious Diseases

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